Galaxy Nope Samsung has finally stopped making its Galaxy Note 7, at least temporarily according to a story this morning in The New York Times. The smartphone is an Achilles Heel for the tech company, with five of its replacement devices now catching fire, and at least two carriers—including AT&T; and T-Mobile—halting sales of the Samsung smartphone. The smartphone problem started weeks ago with news that the original Galaxy Note 7's were sparking and smoking because of battery issues. Samsung then asked consumers to turn their Galaxy Note 7 devices in to be replaced. At this point, Samsung hasn't officially announced whether it will formally replace or recall the devices entirely. But as Samsung's devices continue to erupt, it's likely the company will have to take further action soon.


Self-Driving State California is quickly turning into the self-driving car capital with two more carmakers being granted permission to test their autonomous vehicles in the state. So says The Wall Street Journal, which notes that 19 companies now have permission to test drive autonomous vehicles in California.

Easter Eggs People love to find Easter eggs in their tech—hidden surprises that users stumble upon and aren't part of their regular programming. Google Home is releasing some of of these likely to excite people about its new smart home product. Three include "How old are you?" "What am I thinking right now?" and "Count by 10." What does Google Assistant say back? To learn that, you'd need to have a Google Home yourself.

Tesla Surprise Elon Musk tweeted that his car company is going to unveil a new product on October 17th, with another reveal from Tesla/Solar City on Oct 28th. The tweet immediately sparked his followers with suggestions on what the news could include from a robotic charger that automatically finds the car, to a Tesla motorcycle or Iron Man-like suit. We'll have to wait until next week to hear which, if any, are correct.

VR In Schools One place virtual reality could really make a serious impact is in schools. VR educational apps and headsets aren't just fun and games but offer a unique way for students to view art, space and even human cells. We have some suggestions for educators on different VR headsets and even apps to adopt with their students.