Amazon may give your Alexa recordings to developers

What you say to Alexa may not be private for long.

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Alexa privacy Amazon records what you say to Alexa when you activate your Amazon Echo, Echo Dot, or other Alexa-enabled devices. Alexa products reportedly only start collecting your voice chatter once you say a wake word or phrase — like "Alexa." And that voice data has long been protected by Amazon, the company has stated, used to analyze how the device works, and presumably how you work with the device.

But a story in The Information notes that developers have had access to these recordings made by another voice-controlled device, Google Home. Alexa voice recordings have been off-limits. And Amazon is concerned they may lose its substantial toe-hold with third-parties who build engaging apps and services that bring new customers to Alexa products.

Amazon's has reportedly fought hard against turning over these voice recordings. But handing over this data —you, for example, asking Alexa you want to know what she thinks about dogs — sets up a different kind of relationship with its consumers. Consumers know, without wanting to dwell on it too heavily, that their data is collected and sold: what they buy, how much time they spend on their phone, what they like on social networks and so forth. But their specific voice bartered the same as the fact they click on cat videos is not the same.

Amazon remains mum on whether its considering handing consumer audio recordings over, according to the story and follow-up in The Verge.

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