gearbrain

DolphinAttack can hack Siri and Alexa and you won't hear a thing

Researchers have found that commands played in high-frequencies are heard by the digital assistants—and followed.

Like GearBrain on Facebook

Silent hack While nearly anything connected with an internet connection, and even not, can be hacked, researchers have discovered a way for voice assistants to be hacked from nothing more than ultra-high frequency commands. First human voices issuing commands are turned into frequencies that can't normally be heard by human ears. Called "DolphinAttack," the words are then played near voice assistants which respond, according to a story in Engadget.

Researchers from China's Zheijiang University put the hacking to a test, finding not just Siri and Alexa, but Google Assistant and Samsung S Voice responded. Issuing commands the team hacked in devices including iPads, an Amazon Echo and even an Audi Q3, getting the car to change its direction.

Hackers would have to be within five to six feet of the device they're trying to break into, say researchers. The voice assistant would also have to be on, and waiting for a command, and also respond with a high-pitched sound as well. That may sound normal to a dolphin—but regular humans will reportedly hear sound, and hopefully (hopefully) know something is up.

Robotic health Robots, apps and wearable devices are changing the way people seek medical attention, and even follow-ups as they heal. In some cases, these telehealth options may also be saving people money. What can you expect the next time you need a check-up? From at-home medical tests to doctors ready to take a look at a wound via smartphone, your next doctor appointment may never be the same.

AlertMe
Like GearBrain on Facebook
Show Comments ()